Sample Research Note

Recommended by Dr. Schlabach

 

As you read, choose a manageable unit for note-taking - section, chapter, article, etc. For each unit prepare a half-page (or 8x5 index card) in order to prepare for class discussions and future research.  

 

Note the following components in the sample card below:

 

1.      Author and title across the top (with chapter or section information as needed)

2.      Three to five main points from the reading. 

3.      An asterisk (*) beside the point that you consider to be the single most important point (or thesis) in the reading.  You should also write down page numbers in the margin beside any point that might prove helpful in later projects.

4.      At least one follow-up item.  (This may be a discussion question, an issue to pursue further in your research, a connection to other readings, etc.)

 

(Card looks best with Internet Explorer. If viewing with Netscape, ignore lines on card)

Gunderson   /  “Deeply Woven Roots”   [1]

 

_________________                                                 [2]

Faith has a role in creating/sustaining healthy communities.

                                                                              

*

Even very ordinary congregations have strengths that help them take part in God’s intentions (redeem & renew the world).

 

[3]

“Health” is not just a commodity.  Community integrity. Ecological.

 

p. 17

Admits many congregations are “toxic.”

 

 

Gov’t / corporate / nonprofits all turning to congregations to help deliver services – but need to understand their unique strengths, not just treat them as a tool. 

 

_________________                                                 [4]

G’s def. of health reminds me of “shalom?”

 

What if my congregation is “toxic?”  What then?!!  (good one to discuss)

 

 

·         Optional: On the back you may occasionally wish to write additional follow-up items, jot down responses to study guide questions, and quote particularly juicy quotes, facts or data that might prove helpful in later projects.

 


Page maintained by Gerald W. Schlabach, gwschlabach@stthomas.edu. Copyright © Gerald W. Schlabach. Last updated: 28 November 2000