COJO 350 → WRITING RESOURCES → INFORMATION AND SOURCES

Information at its source

Newswriting depends on information. The quality of the writing is tied to the quality of the information. The quality of the information depends on its source. You find those sources by reading, by asking questions, by searching the Internet, by keeping your eyes and ears open and having a bit of good luck.

Another place to look for sources is our Experts and Information digest of links. The list is not exhaustive, and if you find a good place for seeking out sources, send it along to MO’D in an e-mail.

This page includes a quick take on an important topic, attributing information. For more information on handling directe quotes see Get Me a Quote.

Three types of sources

Reporters and writers want the best information available. They will try to gather it from the people who know the most or who are closest to a situation. These are people likely to have the best information, and they are likely to be the most credible sources.

Attribution

One of the conventions of news writing is that you give the reader some idea of what the source of the information is. This is called attribution. Three things you should know about attribution:

Quoting and paraphrasing

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COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM 350 | UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS | © 2010
INSTRUCTOR: Michael O’Donnell | mjodonnell@stthomas.edu | 651-962-5281